The Dynamics of Group Psycho Therapy

Running head: THE DYNAMICS OF GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY The Dynamics of Group Psychotherapy University of Phoenix The Dynamics of Group Psychotherapy Group psychotherapy has been practiced for nearly one hundred years according to Moreno (1953) it was started by a man named Adler in 1910. Group therapy is different from individual therapy given that the groups are not focusing on themselves as individuals, but rather taking on each problem as a group. Each member learns to be open minded and accepting of others differences as well as views.

Practicing social skills is another advantage of group psychotherapy. Members of the group have equality so no member feels inferior to any other group member. An example of how people are becoming socially withdrawn is in a book by Putnam (2000) where he discusses, more people are bowling but less people are forming leagues. Individuals are isolating themselves, instead of forming groups and having a sense of belonging. Group psychotherapy encourages involvement with others rather than social withdraw, which is what people have a propensity to do if they are in need of therapy.

Once members become aware and have identified the problem that they are facing, they can start focusing on setting and achieving the necessary steps to work toward their individual goals. Each member brings something different to the group that allows the group to analyze the issues from many different perspectives, not just one person’s point of view. Group psychotherapy works well since humans are social beings and are constantly looking for approval from one’s peers, in group psychotherapy everyone gets the social acceptance that our nation is all looking for.

What’s interesting is that members in group therapy will often take on the same role as they do in their personal lives, which allows for the therapist to get an insight into their client’s life styles and personal relationships with others. Once the groups are formed, they begin with a simple yet imperative step which is to introduce themselves and establish some ground rules. Ground rules are important because than the group has a comprehensible and succinct idea of what is expected from each member. Doing his allows the group to have a sense of control on how these sessions are going to be facilitated. Once the introductions and rules are established an open discussion begins. To help determine whether the problems are physical or psychological Dreikurs (1997) adapted what became known in Adlerian circles as “The Question” in the following manner, “What would you be doing if you didn’t have these symptoms or problems? ” During these discussions the therapist is able to distinguish whether each person’s problem is physical or psychological. Mc Goldrick, Watson, & Benson, 1999) stated that within this assessment, the client’s phenomenological interpretation of birth order is essential across cultures, siblings tend to have a greater influence on personality development than parental involvement. In other words, the assessment gives the therapist a opportunity to evaluate each person and see how the members perceive his or her place in this world. After some time and advancement has been made, a group in therapy begins to realize that their actions, attitudes and ways of thinking have repercussions.

The next step is developing an encouraging action plan that will work toward changing their interpersonal behaviors. A challenging aspect of group psychotherapy involves the actual forming of the groups. Making sure the right components are in place is crucial. People are so diverse that without the right balance in the group, desired results might not be achieved. The therapist observes each member’s behavior carefully to assess and diagnose. Finally once enough progress has been achieved the group reaches the summit of psychological reorientation, which is the end point of the group’s therapy.

Hopefully, by this juncture, the majority of the self destructing behaviors have been defined as well as addressed at the same time as the appropriate actions have been facilitated to correct the undesired behaviors. In conclusion the dynamics of group psychotherapy focuses on therapeutically working through individual’s problems in a group setting. All members are equal and are not judged critically. Instead they are embraced and encouraged to work simultaneously as a group. These sessions allow for the groups to grasp and understand themselves as well as others, to analyze and think critically about problems as well solutions.

During therapy problem solving strategies are practiced by role playing. All these strategies are incorporated into the group’s everyday lives. Once a strategy and a goal have been implemented the group works rigidly until they achieve the desired results. Reference Page Carlson, J Watts, R & Maniacci, M. Group Therapy. Adlerian therapy: Theory and Practice (p. 8, para. 4 ) American Psychological Association Retrieved August 30, 2008 by The University of Phoenix Library EBSCO Host. Carlson, J Watts, R & Maniacci, M. Group Therapy. Adlerian therapy: Theory and Practice (p. , para. 2 ) American Psychological Association Retrieved August 30, 2008 by The University of Phoenix Library EBSCO Host. Carlson, J Watts, R & Maniacci, M. Group Therapy. Adlerian therapy: Theory and Practice (p. 1, para. 2 ) American Psychological Association Retrieved August 30, 2008 by The University of Phoenix Library EBSCO Host. Carlson, J Watts, R & Maniacci, M. Group Therapy. Adlerian therapy: Theory and Practice (p. 2, para. 4 ) American Psychological Association Retrieved August 30, 2008 by The University of Phoenix Library EBSCO Host.

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